HIGH PROFILE WATERFRONT HQ

A BOLD, DYNAMIC, STATE-OF-THE-ART ADDITION TO THE
NORTH DOCKS

A BOLD, DYNAMIC, STATE-OF-THE-ART ADDITION TO THE NORTH DOCKS

The Heysham represents a stunning fusion of contemporary and Victorian Architecture set in the heart of Dublin’s vibrant North Docklands.

The contemporary glazed structure extends seven floors above the existing two storey, red brick warehouse to provide a truly unique office setting.

The cutting edge design provides an exceptional waterfront office HQ over nine light-filled floors.

Locating your business here offers you the opportunity to rub shoulders with the world’s most dynamic companies.

25,000 SQ FT / 9 STOREY / GRADE A /
LEED GOLD / BER A3

The Heysham represents a stunning fusion of contemporary and Victorian Architecture set in the heart of Dublin’s vibrant North Docklands.

The contemporary glazed structure extends seven floors above the existing two storey, red brick warehouse to provide a truly unique office setting.

The cutting edge design provides an exceptional waterfront office HQ over nine light-filled floors.

Locating your business here offers you the opportunity to rub shoulders with the world’s most dynamic companies.

25,000 SQ FT / 9 STOREY / GRADE A /
LEED GOLD / BER A3

STACKED WITH FEATURES

0
SQ FT
Overall floor space
0
STORIES
2.7 m floor-to-ceiling height
0
SQ FT
Feature Waterfront Reception
2,500 TO 3,000 SQ FT
Floorplates
1:8
One per 8 sq m design
0
Bicycle spaces
GRADE A
Targeted Build standard
LEED GOLD
Targeted
1:8
One per 8 sq m design
0
Bicycle spaces
GRADE A
Targeted Build standard
LEED GOLD
Targeted

…HISTORY REMAINS

The Heysham has a rich history dating back to 1864 when it first appeared on an Ordnance Survey Map.

The reclamation of the North and South sides of the Liffey, to create the modern day Docklands, largely took place between 1717 and 1760.

By the 1750s, the North Docklands was fully reclaimed with the distinctive grid street pattern, which remains to this day. The new railway era in the mid-19th century resulted in the expansion of the Docks for both freight and passenger trade.

From the 1850s onwards, the North Docks became a busy international port, with its plots occupied by timber yards, sawmills, cattle yards, vinegar works associated industries and shipping companies.

Burns and Laird Lines Ltd was one such shipping company. An amalgamation of two old established Glasgow companies, they pioneered steam services between Scotland and Ireland. Dating back to the early 1920s, Burns and Laird transported goods and livestock between Scotland and Ireland enabling trade from Glasgow directly to Northwall Quay with regular sailings each way.

More recently, the building was owned by one of the country’s best known haulage companies, the Molloy & Sherry logistics and warehousing group.

BELONGING TO BURNS AND LAIRD, THE YARD WITH CONCRETE FLOOR WAS KNOWN AS THE “HEYSHAM YARD”

Extract from The Portal Inspection Order of 1924.

North Wall Quay c.1915.
Photo: National Library of Ireland

North Wall Quay with the Heysham Building from 1958

North Wall Quay with The Heysham building from 1958.

A poster advertising the shipping routes of Burns & Laird Lines from June, 1941.

…HISTORY REMAINS

The Heysham has a rich history dating back to 1864 when it first appeared on an Ordnance Survey Map.

The reclamation of the North and South sides of the Liffey, to create the modern day Docklands, largely took place between 1717 and 1760.

By the 1750s, the North Docklands was fully reclaimed with the distinctive grid street pattern, which remains to this day. The new railway era in the mid-19th century resulted in the expansion of the Docks for both freight and passenger trade.

From the 1850s onwards, the North Docks became a busy international port, with its plots occupied by timber yards, sawmills, cattle yards, vinegar works associated industries and shipping companies.

Burns and Laird Lines Ltd was one such shipping company. An amalgamation of two old established Glasgow companies, they pioneered steam services between Scotland and Ireland. Dating back to the early 1920s, Burns and Laird transported goods and livestock between Scotland and Ireland enabling trade from Glasgow directly to Northwall Quay with regular sailings each way.

More recently, the building was owned by one of the country’s best known haulage companies, the Molloy & Sherry logistics and warehousing group.

North Wall Quay c.1915.
Photo: National Library of Ireland

North Wall Quay with the Heysham Building from 1958

North Wall Quay with The Heysham building from 1958.

A poster advertising the shipping routes of Burns & Laird Lines from June, 1941.

BELONGING TO BURNS AND LAIRD, THE YARD WITH CONCRETE FLOOR WAS KNOWN AS THE “HEYSHAM YARD”

Extract from The Portal Inspection Order of 1924.